Blog

The Hill – U.S.-China Solar Trade Dispute

U.S.-China Solar Trade Dispute: Short-Term Profit vs. Long-Term Viability

Matthew Stepp and Michelle Wein
Published July 24, 2014

The United States and China are locked in a protracted solar trade war that has caused controversy within the solar industry. While some deride the war as harmful, the United States must continue to aggressively fight with all means necessary. Not taking action is irresponsibly shortsighted and threatens the long-term viability of the global solar industry.

Carbon Pricing & Renewables, What Does It All Mean?

CCEI Executive Director Matthew Stepp was interviewed by Talk Solar host Beth Bond on energy innovation policy – covering everything from fossil fuel subsidies, carbon pricing, and national vs. sub-national energy innovation strategies.

Listen to the interview.

Originally posted at Clean Technica.

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    Beyond Paris, Part 5: Pivoting International Climate Policy to Innovation

Beyond Paris, Part 5: Pivoting International Climate Policy to Innovation

By Matthew Stepp and Amanda Kibbe, Center for Clean Energy Innovation

In 2012, Jesse Jenkins and Matthew Stepp took stock of the global climate policy challenge in an online series titled The Future of Global Climate Policy. Since then the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) completed its Fifth Assessment and many countries are taking stock of their existing—and some argue, failed—climate policies. Looking to the future, the latest round of international climate negotiations is set to close in Paris at the end of 2015, potentially offering the end of one era of global climate policymaking and the start of something new. With an eye on the long-term impacts of the 2015 negotiations, Amanda Kibbe and Matthew Stepp take an updated look in a five-part series on the state of the climate challenge. Part 1Part 2Part 3, and Part 4.

Society must act quickly to implement policies that provide the world the tools it needs to cut carbon and put the world on a path for deep decarbonization. The more time we let pass without aggressive action, the higher […]

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    Beyond Paris, Part 4: Putting an Asterisk on Climate Change Mitigation Cost Projections

Beyond Paris, Part 4: Putting an Asterisk on Climate Change Mitigation Cost Projections

By Matthew Stepp and Amanda Kibbe, Center for Clean Energy Innovation

In 2012, Jesse Jenkins and Matthew Stepp took stock of the global climate policy challenge in an online series titled The Future of Global Climate Policy. Since then the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) completed its Fifth Assessment and many countries are taking stock of their existing—and some argue, failed—climate policies. Looking to the future, the latest round of international climate negotiations is set to close in Paris at the end of 2015, potentially offering the end of one era of global climate policymaking and the start of something new. With an eye on the long-term impacts of the 2015 negotiations, Amanda Kibbe and Matthew Stepp take an updated look in a five-part series on the state of the climate challenge. Click here for Part 1Part 2, and Part 3.

In Part 3 of this series, we summarized the monumental task of mitigating climate change, particularly if we run on a “business as usual” track in the short-term and delay carbon reductions. It paints a bleak picture, but even with […]

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    Beyond Paris, Part 3: Overshooting Dangerous Warming Likely, But For How Long?

Beyond Paris, Part 3: Overshooting Dangerous Warming Likely, But For How Long?

By Matthew Stepp and Amanda Kibbe, Center for Clean Energy Innovation

In 2012, Jesse Jenkins and Matthew Stepp took stock of the global climate policy challenge in an online series titled The Future of Global Climate Policy. Since then the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) completed its Fifth Assessment and many countries are taking stock of their existing—and some argue, failed—climate policies. Looking to the future, the latest round of international climate negotiations is set to close in Paris at the end of 2015, potentially offering the end of one era of global climate policymaking and the start of something new. With an eye on the long-term impacts of the 2015 negotiations, Amanda Kibbe and Matthew Stepp take an updated look in a five-part series on the state of the climate challenge. For Part 1, click hereFor Part 2, click here.

Solving climate change is an extremely difficult—even monumental—challenge to address. Carbon emissions come from burning fossil fuels and are deeply embedded in the global economy. Turning on the lights, driving vehicles, powering industry, and living a prosperous life all emit carbon. As a result, […]

Beyond Paris, Part 2: The Dire Consequences of Inaction

By Matthew Stepp and Amanda Kibbe, Center for Clean Energy Innovation

In 2012, Jesse Jenkins and Matthew Stepp took stock of the global climate policy challenge in an online series titled The Future of Global Climate Policy. Since then the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) completed its Fifth Assessment and many countries are taking stock of their existing—and some argue, failed—climate policies. Looking to the future, the latest round of international climate negotiations is set to close in Paris at the end of 2015, potentially offering the end of one era of global climate policymaking and the start of something new. With an eye on the long-term impacts of the 2015 negotiations, Amanda Kibbe and Matthew Stepp take an updated look in a five-part series on the state of the climate challenge. Click here for Part 1.

In Part 1, we discussed the IPCC’s most recent take on some of the major indicators of a warming planet and how pumping CO2 into the atmosphere is accelerating these changes. The next logical question is: what are the potential future impacts of a changing climate system? More extreme weather? Higher […]

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    Beyond Paris, Part 1: Humans are Changing the Climate for the Worse

Beyond Paris, Part 1: Humans are Changing the Climate for the Worse

By Matthew Stepp and Amanda Kibbe, Center for Clean Energy Innovation

In 2012, Jesse Jenkins and Matthew Stepp took stock of the global climate policy challenge in an online series titled The Future of Global Climate Policy. Since then the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) completed its Fifth Assessment and many countries are taking stock of their existing—and some argue, failed—climate policies. Looking to the future, the latest round of international climate negotiations is set to close in Paris at the end of 2015, potentially offering the end of one era of global climate policymaking and the start of something new. With an eye on the long-term impacts of the 2015 negotiations, Amanda Kibbe and Matthew Stepp take an updated look in a five-part series on the state of the climate challenge.

Global climate change is often difficult to assess. The weather changes daily and global climate changes on long timescales. Regions and countries are impacted differently. It is challenging to express complex, long-term climate trends in comparison to daily and seasonal changes in the weather that the general public experiences. But with each passing year, the science, observations, and modeling of […]

The Hill – EPA Regulations

Want More Stringent EPA Carbon Caps? We Need Innovation Policy

Matthew Stepp
Published June 18, 2014

While the tougher emissions regulations recently implemented by the EPA will incent some additional clean energy development, long term transition away from fossil fuels will not be possible unless clean energy becomes cheaper than fossil fuels. The most effective way to accomplish this is through a comprehensive innovation strategy marked by enhanced investment in clean energy research, development and demonstration.

Barriers to U.S. Global Clean Energy Leadership

United States House Natural Resources Committee
Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources
U.S. House of Representatives

Oversight and Management of Department of Energy
National Laboratories and Science Activities

June 12, 2014; 9:30-10:30AM

Matthew Stepp testified before the United States House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources. Stepp focuses on the potential benefits of and barriers to the United States becoming a global leader in innovative clean energy technologies.

Read his oral testimony, read his full written testimony, or watch the webcast of the full hearing.

By |June 16th, 2014|Events, Uncategorized|Comments Off|

The Energy Collective Analyzes EPA’s Power Plant Carbon Regulations

On Monday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) unveiled an historic proposal to cut carbon dioxide emissions from the nation’s power plants to 30% below 2005 levels by 2030. The ambitious and flexible proposed regulations would see each state develop it’s own plan to cut power sector carbon emissions using a variety of options, from improving power plant efficiency or capturing CO2 at smokestacks to “beyond the fence” measures to increase the use of clean energy, improve end-use energy efficiency, or even join or create interstate markets for carbon trading.

All week, experts at TheEnergyCollective.com have been reacting to and dissecting the EPA’s new regulations. Today, I moderated a live videocast with Energy Collective experts and featured columnists Geoff Styles, Matthew Stepp (of The Capitol Energy Report) and John Miller (of Energy and Policy Developments). (Jim Pierobon of Game Changers also joined briefly but was disconnected due to technical difficulties).

We covered the hot topics and key questions that have surfaced about EPA regulations:

  • How does EPA establish CO2 reduction targets for each state?
  • What options do states have to comply with the EPA CO2 targets?
  • What legal challenges will the proposed rule face?
  • What impacts […]